ORIGINAL ART: MORE TALES OF UNCLE REMUS - RABBIT AND FOX ON ROOF. JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS.

BEAUTIFUL PINKNEY ART

(PINKNEY, JERRY)illus.

ORIGINAL ART: MORE TALES OF UNCLE REMUS - RABBIT AND FOX ON ROOF

PINKNEY,JERRY (HARRIS,JOEL CHANDLER)illus. ORIGINAL ART: MORE TALES OF UNCLE REMUS - RABBIT AND FOX ON ROOF - by Joel Chandler Harris. We are pleased to offer this art by Pinkney used in his edition of More Tales of Uncle Remus published in 1988 by Dial. This is a detailed pen and ink drawing that appears on page 5. The actual image measures 6 1/2" wide x 7" high on art paper 7 1/2 x 11" and is signed - a charming image. Jerry Pinkney has been illustrating children's books since 1964 and has the rare distinction of being the recipient of three Caldecott Honor Medals -- in 1995 for John Henry by Julius Lester (Dial), in 1990 for The Talking Eggs by Robert D. San Souci (Dial) and in 1989 for Mirandy and Brother Wind by Patricia C. McKissack (Knopf). He has won the Coretta Scott King Award three times and a Coretta Scott King Honor twice. Mr. Pinkney has received four awards for his body of work: the Drexel Citation for Children's Literature, the David McCord Award , the Philadelphia School of Art and Design Alumni Award, and the Keene State College Children's Literature Festival Award. In addition to his work on children's books, he is an extremely successful artist who has had eleven one-man retrospectives at venues ranging from the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, the Art Institute of Chicago and Pittsburgh Children's Museum. and will be traveling through 1998. Mr. Pinkney has illustrated for a wide variety of clients, including National Geographic , the National Parks Service, the U.S. Postal Service, the American Library Association and the Association of Booksellers for Children.... Many of Mr. Pinkney's children's books celebrate multicultural and African American themes. 'Working on both the Uncle Remus tales and John Henry has shown me an important link between pivotal and opposite African American folk heroes. Brer Rabbit, the sly trickster, originated during slavery and was the first African American folk hero. Slaves who wanted to get the better of their masters needed to be cunning and sly -- hence the trickster role.' " (from Penguin web site).

[Item #34301]

Price: $2,000.00